What Do Human Eyes Have In Common With Ancient Insects?

By Staff
Friday, August 16, 2019 2:45 PM Insect eyes are pretty amazing, and some new research shows that we might have more in common with them than we thought. According to the National Eye Institute and Phys.org, fossilized flies from 54 million years ago had eyes that captured light in the same way as human eyes do today, and this new discovery has potential to tell us a lot about the evolution of sight. Head over to Phys.org to learn more about this research, which was originally published in Nature

Chilling Out On National Relaxation Day

By Staff
Thursday, August 15, 2019 1:19 PM R+R. We talk about it a lot, but how much time do we really dedicate to rest and relaxation? For many people, the answer is the same: not nearly enough. Yesterday was National Relaxation Day, a day dedicated both to relaxation and education about how and why recuperation is so vital for our mental and physical health. Our stress levels take a toll on everything our bodies do—including our physical health, which includes our eye health. Head over to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to learn more about how relaxation can change your health, and to pick up some new tips, tricks, and relaxation techniques. 

Zooming In On Real Life

By Staff
Wednesday, August 14, 2019 10:42 AM Blink twice, zoom in. Shengqiang Cai, a professor of engineering at the University of California, San Diego, and his team, have began filing patents for a new contact lens that allows the wearer to change the focal length of the lens with a double blink. It's still early days for this new technology, which The Smithsonian reported on earlier this week, but the potential of this research is an exciting development in the intersection between technology and eyecare. Head over to The Smithsonian to hear more from Cai about how these contact lenses work, and where they could go in the future.

Stem Cell Treatment Makes Leaps and Bounds in Eye Disease

By Staff
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 4:25 PM Stem cell research has been a focus for doctors and health care researchers for more than 30 years now. While the research is generally complicated and sometimes slow-moving, there's one area of work where stem cells excel: eyecare. In fact, when it comes to eyecare, stem cell treatments have even helped some patients, like Anna Kuehl, who is profiled in a WebMD article about the treatments for macular degeneration. Head over to WebMD to learn more about stem cell research, how it's changing the world of eyecare, and what changes it might make to other areas of health care. 

A Different Way Of Looking At Blindness

By Staff
Monday, August 12, 2019 1:32 PM Rodney Evans is a filmmaker who has been losing his eyesight due to retinitis pigmentosa. His newest film, featured in The New York Times, is an essay documentary titled "Vision Portraits," which profiles various artists with vision impairment. Evans' film shows the many different ways visually impaired people create their art, as well as their approaches to life and vision. Head over to The New York Times to read more about the poignant documentary. 

How Glasses and Some Tape Fooled Apple's Face ID

By Staff
Friday, August 9, 2019 11:54 AM Apple's Face ID is a pretty amazing tool—so much so that it can actually differentiate between identical twins most of the time. But according to Mashable, researchers from Tencent, a Chinese company, set out to foil Face ID. They managed to do it by donning a pair of glasses with tape over the lenses, which could fool what Mashable calls the "liveness" detection on Face ID. But there's another big catch: the person has to be unconscious, too. Head over to Mashable to learn more about how these researchers used glasses to fool Face ID. 

Celebrating #InternationalCatDay With Some Sight Facts

By Staff
Thursday, August 8, 2019 11:08 AM There's no question that cats are special animals. They're wonderful companions for humans, but they are also some of the most graceful, dangerous, and beautiful creatures in nature—all thanks, in part, to their unique way of seeing the world. So what better way to celebrate International Cat Day, which was yesterday, August 8, than to learn all about cats' eyesight? Head over to Live Science to learn how cats see the world, and why that makes them such special animals.

How SmartGoggles Could Change Cancer Care

By Staff
Wednesday, August 7, 2019 12:47 PM The landscape of cancer care is constantly changing, growing, and developing. For physicians at Cleveland Clinic, cancer care for come people with breast cancer now includes a newly developed prototype, SmartGoggles, that could change the way they conduct biopsies. According to Consult QD, these new SmartGoggles, which surgeons would wear while conducting the biopsy, feature real-time fluorescent imaging, and allow doctors to see the disease in 3D. Head over to Consult QD to learn more about how these developing SmartGoggles, developed by Yang Liu, Ph.D, at the University of Akron, and Francis Papay, MD, chair of Cleveland Clinic’s Dermatology and Plastic Surgery Institute, are changing the cancer care landscape, and how the use of eyewear and technology might impact cancer care in the future.

Designing A Home For Vision Loss

By Staff
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 1:20 PM When it comes to interior design, we think about a lot of things: color, layout, lighting, and fabrics. But how do we have to adapt our thinking about interior design when it comes to visual impairment? In partnership with Novartis, Nate Berkus, celebrity interior designer and host of "Nate & Jeremiah by Design" on TLC is participating in the My Home in Sight program, which helps people with wet AMD make design changes that will help them preserve their independence. Head over to Healthline to learn more about this design program, and how we can change the way we live to be inclusive of everyone by paying attention to things like lighting, color and contrast, organization, and special tools.

More Photos Means More Business

By Staff
Monday, August 5, 2019 11:38 AM When it comes to building your business, establishing an online presence is one of the most important steps you take. Still, getting settled online can be intimidating, overwhelming, and confusing for many business owners. According to new research by BrightLocal and Search Engine Land, though, there's one thing most business owners can be almost positive will help their business online: high quality photos. In fact, ensuring that high-quality photos of your businesses are easily available online for potential customers is almost a sure-fire way to increase your website visions, direction requests, and calls. Head over to Search Engine Land to see the research and learn why getting a photographer on the team could change the game. 

The Coolest Shades on Instagram

By Staff
Friday, August 2, 2019 11:42 AM Aggie Nam is an eyewear creator based in South Korea who doesn't consider herself a designer. Despite that, her chic, intricate, ornate sunglasses have become something of an it-frame on Instagram. In a recent profile with i-D, Nam explained that her line, GODSOMEWARE, is only available on Etsy, and gave some insight into how she developed these showstopping, couture frames. Take a look at the i-D profile to learn some more, and head over to Instagram to see how these frames look on some of the coolest faces in fashion. 

UK Drivers Over 70 May Have to Take Eye Exams to Keep Their License

By Staff
Thursday, August 1, 2019 11:02 AM According to The BBC, The U.K.'s Department for Transport is considering instituting mandatory eye exams for drivers over 70. According to one proposal, drivers over 70 would be required to take an eye exam every three years in order to keep their license. The proposed test would require drivers to demonstrate that they can read a license plate from 65 feet away. In 2018, 4,603 drivers in the United Kingdom lost their licenses due to poor eyesight, and The BBC reports that in the past five years, "37 people have been killed and almost 1,100 people injured in crashes where uncorrected or defective eyesight was a contributing factor." Take a look at the article from The BBC to learn more about this proposal. 

Celebrating Harry Potter and His Iconic Glasses

By Staff
Wednesday, July 31, 2019 9:00 AM For millions of people around the world, July 31 marks a special day: the birthday of author JK Rowling and her most iconic character, Harry Potter. Online, fans gathered to celebrate Harry's birthday by rewatching the films, rereading the books, and even making cakes to replicate the cake Hagrid gifts to Harry on his 12th birthday. In addition to being The Boy Who Lived, Harry Potter as a character also made a huge impact on the lives of many kids who, just like Harry, began wearing glasses at a young age. In fact, Potter's round glasses and his lightning bolt scar are, without a doubt, the most iconic characteristics of his image. According to Mental Floss, the iconic, Made in England, round metal wire glasses that Daniel Radcliffe wore while filming the Harry Potter movies went to auction. The frames were expected to sell for around $3,800 to $6,300, proving just how culturally significant a pair of glasses can be. 

The WHO Has Officially Recognized Burnout As A Syndrome

By Staff
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 10:29 AM According to the American Medical Association, the World Health Organization has officially added burnout to its International Disease Classification, or the ICD-11, their official list of diseases. Burnout is listed as a syndrome, which results from "chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed," the AMA reports. It includes feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion, increased mental distance or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job, and reduced professional efficacy. Take a look at the AMA's article on what this means for doctors and people who's professions often lead to professional burnout. 

Using Emojis Could Up Your Email Game

By Staff
Monday, July 29, 2019 12:24 PM Young people in the workplace have long been told to leave the emojis and smiley faces to their texting habits. But according to a new study by Adobe, reported by Inc., emojis actually aren't as unprofessional as many people have been made to think. In fact, using emojis at work could be a good thing, says Adobe's Emoji Trend Report, because they help convey emotion and tone that is otherwise lost over email. Head over to Inc. to read about some of the other, unique ways different workplaces have made emoji use company policy.