Reinventing Cities for a Zero-Carbon Future

By Staff
Friday, May 24, 2019 4:05 PM Reinventing Cities, a competition launched two years ago by C40 Cities, a network of mayors focused on finding solutions to climate change, asked architects to reimagine new uses for vacant and abandoned spaces in six cities: Chicago, Madrid, Milan, Paris, Oslo, and Reykjavík. These are the winning proposals; the winning teams now have the chance to buy or lease each site to develop the projects. The designs include a new net-zero carbon housing development which has been designed for two vacant lots in Garfield Park, an underserved Chicago neighborhood. Read the full article in Fast Company.

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s 7 Pieces of Advice for New Graduates

By Staff
Thursday, May 23, 2019 3:16 PM 2019 marks the 10th year of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business list, so they reached out to some notable alumni to get their advice on creativity. Here, Lin-Manuel Miranda, who was number one on their 2016 list, shares his best advice for new graduates who want to lead creative lives. When it comes to creativity, finding collaborative partners is key, said the creator and star of Hamilton. And so is just being a good person. Click here to read his seven pieces of advice.

An Eye Test Could Provide Early Warning of Alzheimer's Disease, Study Says

By Staff
Tuesday, May 21, 2019 4:32 PM In the future, a doctor might be able to tell whether someone is heading toward Alzheimer's disease—not by carrying out expensive brain scans, but during an eye exam. A new study paper in the journal Ophthalmology Retina outlines research that took place at Duke Eye Center in Durham, N.C. The researchers propose that a loss in density of blood vessels in the retina could suggest development of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers studied more than 200 people with normal brain function as well as individuals with Alzheimer's. They used a technique called optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), which is noninvasive and can reveal blood flow in every layer of the retina. In the control group, they found that the web of tiny blood vessels located at the back of the eye was quite dense. The vessels of those with Alzheimer's disease, however, were less dense. Click here to read the full story from MedicalNewsToday.

Two-Thirds of Americans Say Health Care Doesn’t Work Well

By Staff
Monday, May 20, 2019 2:52 PM In this post from health economist Jane Sarasohn-Kahn, health care is the top issue facing the U.S. today, one in three Americans said, with another one-fourth pointing to the economy. Together, health care and the economy rank the top issues for 62 percent of Americans. Sarasohn-Kahn said, “Health care and the economy are, in fact, intimately tied in every American’s personal household economy I assert in my book, HealthConsuming: From Health Consumer to Health Citizen. This poll from RealClear Politics, conducted in late April/early May 2019, makes my point that the patient is the consumer and, facing deductibles and more financial exposure to footing the medical bill, the payor.” Click here to read more about her take on why many Americans believe the health care system isn’t working well.

May 19: 'Deductible Relief Day'

By Staff
Monday, May 20, 2019 2:46 PM The Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) declared May 19 “Deductible Relief Day,” as a way of bringing awareness to a growing issue with high-deductible health plans. Cost-shifting by employer-based plans, originally hailed as a way to make consumers smarter shoppers for health services, have become problematic as Americans on these plans report struggling with affordability when it comes to accessing health care services. Kaiser set out to estimate the time of year when the average person with employer coverage satisfies their deductible and how that has changed over time. This year, Kaiser estimated “Deductible Relief Day”—the day when enrollees have on average incurred enough health spending to hit the average deductible in an employer plan—fell on Sunday, May 19, 2019. Click here to read more about how rising deductibles are affecting people with employer coverage.

For Retail And Health Care, the Future Is Now

By Staff
Friday, May 17, 2019 12:11 PM Retailers and big business are seizing a multibillion dollar opportunity to capitalize on the changing face and rising costs of health care. Haven Healthcare, a company whose mission it is to “transform health care to create better outcomes and overall experience, as well as lower costs for you and your family,” has partnered with companies such as Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JP Morgan with the intention of changing the face of employer-provided health care. In addition, Walgreens and CVS (who acquired health insurance company Aetna) are launching what is referred to as “personalized health care services.” Click here to read the story from RetailMinded.

Forrester: Retailers Are Starting to Reap the Rewards of Omnichannel Commerce

By Staff
Thursday, May 16, 2019 11:09 AM There’s no denying it: Consumer demands are higher than ever. But then again, so is their profit potential. Just think: Shoppers have been known to spend 21.7 times more when they purchase both online and in-store, rather than at retailer locations only. And that’s just one finding, shared by one retailer, in Forrester’s latest report: Retailers Are Starting to Reap the Rewards of Omnichannel Commerce. This important report includes numerous other insights on consumers’ changing shopping behaviors, and the omnichannel strategies retailers are using to meet them. It’s everything you need to know about the current state of omnichannel commerce, including what leading retailers are doing to personalize and perfect the customer experience. Click here to read the full story from ChannelAdvisor.

Imaging That Twinkle in Your Eye

By Staff
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 3:05 PM Jesse B. Schallek, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology, describes a new, noninvasive approach to assess vascular health in the journal eLife. Schallek’s lab, part of the Flaum Eye Institute at the University of Rochester, developed a method to visualize how single blood cells flow through vessels of the eye using adaptive optics imaging. Schallek’s team developed high-resolution adaptive optics combined with fast camera capture to visualize single-cell blood flow dynamics in a living mouse eye. “We’re able to image single blood cells and measure their speed. Remarkably, this can be achieved in vessels of all sizes, from the smallest capillaries to the largest retinal vessels,” said Schallek. “This approach may eventually provide a view of patient vascular health without the need for blood draws or dyes. Click here to read more about their research.

5 Ways to Get Your Eyes Summer Ready

By Staff
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 3:22 PM As the weather gets warmer and the days grow longer, we often think about improving our health and getting into better shape. As you prepare to enjoy the outdoors this summer, don’t forget a plan for keeping your eyes happy as well. Here are five ways to keep your eyes safe and healthy this summer: avoid getting a "sunburn of the eye;" prevent “swimmer’s eye” in the pool; keep dry eye at bay; don’t play around with eye safety; and quit smoking. Read more about summer eye health in this feature from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Wall Street Rout Worsens as China Hits Back on Trade

By Staff
Monday, May 13, 2019 2:35 PM U.S. stock markets fell more than 2 percent on Monday after China announced retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods, heightening fears of a full-blown trade war between the world’s two largest economies that could cripple global economic growth. According to this post from Reuters, at the heart of the selloff were shares in major technology companies including Apple Inc as well as chipmakers, manufacturers and retailers that draw large chunks of their revenue from China. Apple’s shares fell 5.2 percent, putting the S&P and the Dow on track for their biggest one-day percentage drop since Jan. 3. The selloff that began with stocks surfing at an all-time high on May 1 has now knocked almost 5 percent off the S&P 500 in less than two weeks. Read More.

The Risks of Oversharing at Work and How to Set Better Boundaries

By Staff
Friday, May 10, 2019 4:27 PM I once heard a comedian say that he had gone on so many dates with a woman, he felt he needed to stay with her for eternity simply because she knew too much. He didn’t even get to the punch line before the audience was in stitches. It made me wonder how many of these same people may have spilled their guts about something personal at their office earlier in the day. Maintaining boundaries at work is critical. The risks of sharing too much information far outweigh the rewards of doing so. This doesn’t mean we should never make friends at work, or that we should let paranoia guide our days. It just means that we need to use common sense in our professional communications and relationships. Click here to read more about setting boundaries at work in this feature from Fast Company.

Strokes and Your Vision

By Staff
Thursday, May 9, 2019 1:29 PM Did you know that May is Stroke Awareness Month? A stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is suddenly interrupted or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts. In the U.S., more than 700,000 people suffer a stroke each year, and approximately two-thirds of these individuals survive and require rehabilitation. Although stroke is a disorder of the brain, it can affect the entire body. Depending on the location of the stroke, people may suffer loss of motor, neurological and perceptual function, as well as experience double vision, blurring, headaches or inability to detect obstacles. About two-thirds of stroke survivors have visual impairment that typically relates to diminished central or peripheral vision, eye movement abnormalities or visual perceptual defects. For more on how a stroke can affect vision, click here to read the full story from the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association (NORA).

Eye-Opening Study: Relationship Between Glaucoma and Poor Sleep

By Staff
Wednesday, May 8, 2019 3:34 PM A study of more than 6,700 people in the U.S. over age 40 who answered a survey about their sleep revealed possible connections between glaucoma and sleep problems. Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve. The study participants were glaucoma patients with evidence of optic nerve damage and vision loss in some portions of their visual field. The study found an association between having glaucoma and having various sleep problems. Among the findings: people who slept for 10 or more hours a night were three times more likely to have glaucoma-related optic nerve damage than those who slept 7 hours a night. Also, the odds of having missing vision were three times higher among people who got 3 or fewer or 10 or more hours of sleep per night, compared with those who got 7 hours a night. Click here to read the full story from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Janell Monae’s Stylist Details Her Met Gala Look

By Staff
Tuesday, May 7, 2019 11:54 AM New York Times fashion critic Vanessa Friedman tells Janelle Monae “it’s hats off to you” in this post about Monae’s costume at Monday night’s Met Gala. Here’s the background story on Monae’s “surreal” Met Gala look in this interview in Variety with her stylist. “Alexandra Mandelkorn went through 15 sketches before settling on Janelle Monae’s final Met Gala look. Mandelkorn is the mastermind stylist behind Monae’s red carpet reign and is responsible for her style from PYNK-era to present. When it comes to Monae’s look for the first Monday of May event, Mandelkorn turned to Picasso and Dali for inspiration and incorporated surrealism with the artificial and over-the-top. The charity ball, hosted by Vogue editor Anna Wintour and a band of talent, is known for making hundreds of stars play by the rules of the annual theme, which is inspired this year by the Susan Sontag essay Notes on Camp."

F/W ’19 Pantone Fashion Color Report: An Inside Look at Fall Hues

By Staff
Monday, May 6, 2019 4:33 PM As summer quickly approaches, the fashion world is already two steps ahead and looking toward the fall/winter fashion weeks. With the release of the Pantone Color Institute fall/winter 2019 fashion color report for both New York and London, we’re getting an inside peek into what our future wardrobes will look like. Click here to take a look at what the coming season’s many colorations will include in this post from The Vision Council’s Eyecessorize blog.